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Creative Non-Fiction Course

Duration:
6 weeks

Aimed at:
All levels

Location:
Online

Price:
£365.00

26th September 2017
2 Places available.

Course Overview

This course will help you learn the techniques and strategies to develop a quality work of non-fiction. It provides an insight into the art of writing non-fiction - from memoir and creative non-fiction,  to humour  and  popular reference via journalism  and  criticism. It will help you develop, test and really work your ideas. It will show you how to hone in on your subject, structure your manuscript and nail your pitch.

You don't need to have any prior creative writing experience - most of our students don't.

We'll find out what works for you. We'll explore how you can best express yourself and say exactly you want to say. Whether you start the course with a definite idea, or without a clue about what you are going to write, by the end of six weeks you'll have a solid platform to  help you take your project from inception to completion.

*There is a reading list associated with this course. It will be made available upon booking confirmation


PLUS SPECIAL INDUSTRY GUEST ON WEEK 6

Publisher and Editor Eloise Millar will take part on an online Q&A. A wonderful opportunity to gain the low down on the industry, insights into the world of publishing and advice on approaching publishers.


On this course you will learn how to:

* Generate and refine original ideas to establish what kind of writer you want to be

* Apply journalistic techniques relating to research,interviewing and reviewing to help      develop your ideas and express them on thepage

* Create a solid structure for your book

* Start editing and refine your work

* Begin to find your unique voice

* Write a professional pitch


Course Syllabus


Week one

Getting off to a flying start

Where do ideas come from? Which ones work? How do youdevelop them into a substantial work?

We’ll begin to find a way into our writing and make sure we aren’t daunted by that blank first page. We’ll also look at ways to test our concepts and make sure we know where they’re heading.

And we’ll look at a few other writers and ways they can give us useful models.

Week Two

Effective communication: finding your voice and reaching your audience

Who will read your book and why? We'll discuss different audiences and different ways to reach them - and also why it's okay if you just want to write for yourself...

We'll have fun looking at a few distinctive voices and authorial presences  - and we’ll find outsome more about the most important character in your own work: you.

Week Three

Making progress: moving things forward and keeping them moving

Good storytelling is as important in non-fiction as fiction.We’ll find out how to spin a really good yarn. We'll talk about when to show, when to tell and when to do a bit of both. We’ll talk about techniques for moving things forward and maintaining momentum. We’ll also look at a few good journalistic techniques for passing on facts quickly – and making those facts interesting.

Week Four

Making it talk: effective dialogue, gripping drama, and harnessing your research to good effect

Just as in fiction, dialogue and drama are crucial to many forms of non-fiction - and the rules are very similar. We'll take some useful hints from Elmore Leonard, a top crime writer.


We’ll also look at how to make your research really work for you – and how to make sure you can always see the wood as well as the trees when it comes to gathering and conveying information.

Week Five

Making it real: sensory responses

How do you bring alive landscapes,objects, memories, different times and places? We'll look at close observation of and sensory responses to the world around us and within ourselves. We'll also look at being creative with non-fiction, putting flesh on bare bones and when your own imagination can help you tell your story.

Week Six

Wrapping up - and tying a nice bow + SPECIAL GUEST!

It's time to assess our work and achievements over the past six weeks - and also to think about how to take things even further. We’ll talk about the fine art of editing and redrafting, how to keep going when the going gets tough and what do when you get to the end. We’ll think about how best to pitch your work. And how to put together a professional submission pack.


PLUS SPECIAL INDUSTRY GUEST ON WEEK 6

Publisher and Editor Eloise Millar will take part on an online Q&A. A wonderful opportunity to gain the low down on the industry, insights into the world of publishing and advice on approaching publishers.

We are delighted to announce that we will be joined by publisher, novelist and non-fiction author Eloise Millar from Galley Beggar Press in the last week of the course.

Eloise is the author of Wednesday’s Child, co-author of Literary London and co-director of(and brains behind) Galley Beggar Press, the award winning independent publisher and publisher of Eimear McBride’s A Girl Is A Half-formed Thing and Alex Pheby’s Playthings. She also teaches on publishing courses at UEA and Greenwich university.

This will be an opportunity for all students to ask all those burning questions they may have about the industry and get advice from a real expert.

Course Tutors

Sam Jordison

Sam Jordison is an author, publisher, journalist and teacher. He is the co-director of the award winning Galley Beggar Press. He writes regularly about books and the publishing industry for The Guardian. He has taught courses on publishing, journalism and creative writing at UEA, Kingston University and the University of Greenwich. He has published several non-fiction books including the best-selling Crap Towns series, a book on literature and London called (aptly enough) Literary London, and a new series of I-SPy books for adults. He is currently working on a book about HG Wells and bikes. 

Eloise Millar

Publisher,novelist and non-fiction author Eloise Millar from Galley Beggar Press will join us for a Q&A session in the last week of the course.

Eloise is the author of Wednesday’s Child, co-author of Literary London and co-director of(and brains behind) Galley Beggar Press, the award winning independent publisher and publisher of Eimear McBride’s A Girl Is A Half-formed Thing and Alex Pheby’s Playthings. She also teaches on publishing courses at UEA and Greenwich university.

Course Feedback

Here's feedback from our course users.

Average Course Rating:
(2 Customer Reviews)
5 Star
(2)
4 Star
(0)
3 Star
(0)
2 Star
(0)
1 Star
(0)

Customer Reviews
My Review on the Creative Non Fiction Writing Course - YaaYaa1st March 2017
By Mary Tagoe
I found this course very helpful in the development of my ability to write as a novice and first time writer. The course has provided me with suggestions for generating and looking for ideas in differ ... read more..
I found this course very helpful in the development of my ability to write as a novice and first time writer. The course has provided me with suggestions for generating and looking for ideas in different places and developing them into stories. It has also provided me with advice and guidance on researching and exploring different sources of ideas and using my imagination in creative writing; as well as providing me with guidance in the use of dialogue and reported speech in the development of my writing style. The reading list with additional suggested reading during the course, the course notes and video and the feedback from SamJ have been immensely helpful and will continue to be useful as a source of reference for the future.
Enjoyable and helpful course - recommended for anyone wanting to kickstart their writing21st June 2017
By John Worthington
I found the course really useful, well-structured and supportive, and flexible enough to fit around a busy work/family schedule. The tutor Sam's notes were full of good ideas and tips, and the weekly ... read more..
I found the course really useful, well-structured and supportive, and flexible enough to fit around a busy work/family schedule. The tutor Sam's notes were full of good ideas and tips, and the weekly assignments were enjoyable, challenging at times but enabling me to explore new approaches outside of my comfort zone as well as honing my strengths. Most importantly I found the feedback encouraging and constructive, and feel I have gained in writing discipline and confidence from doing it. I now feel I have a stronger platform to take my writing projects forwards.


How our online courses work

Our courses are hosted on our own community site, The Word Cloud, which is a very friendly, intuitive and supportive writing community.

The tools and environment are very intuitive and easy to use: you won't have a problem. Each week, courses will include:

• A video introduction
• A written 'lecture'
• Interactive classroom discussion
• A writing exercise on the week's topic
• Feedback on your homework

All the course material can be accessed at any time of day or night. If you miss a few days, it will be easy to catch up. You are also warmly encouraged to interact with fellow-students - offer advice, give feedback and make friends. Find out more about how our courses work here.